Category: Error

61 publications by Hans J Eysenck and R Grossarth-Maticek that require correction or retraction

1985 HJE’s affiliation was the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London; The affiliation of RG-M at that time is uncertain. 1)CONFERENCE PAPER: Grossarth-Maticek, R., Eysenck, H. J., Vetter, H., & Schmidt, P. (1985). Results of the Heidelberg prospective psychosomatic intervention study. International Conference on Health Psychology, Tilburg University. 1988-1991 Both authors give the Institute of Psychiatry, University …

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Open letter to Mr Sarb Bajwa, Chief Executive of the British Psychological Society

Below is the text of my open letter to Mr Bajwa emailed on 3rd December 2018. To date, no reply has been received. 3 December 2018 Dear Mr Bajwa, I am writing about a serious matter concerning the research integrity of a person who one can presume was a member of the British Psychological Society. …

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Open letter to Professor Edward Byrne, AC FTSE FRACP FRCPE FRCP, President and Principal of King’s College London

3 December 2018 Dear Professor Byrne, I am writing about a serious matter concerning the research integrity of a late employee of your institution. In the interests of openness and transparency, this is an Open Letter. If left unresolved this is a matter that can be expected to produce potential harm to patients, to biomedicine …

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Personality and fatal diseases: Revisiting a scientific scandal

New paper by Dr Anthony Pelosi Abstract During the 1980s and 1990s, Hans J Eysenck conducted a programme of research into the causes, prevention and treatment of fatal diseases in collaboration with one of his protégés, Ronald Grossarth-Maticek. This led to what must be the most astonishing series of findings ever published in the peer-reviewed …

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The Hans Eysenck Affair: Time to Correct the Scientific Record

Abstract The Journal of Health Psychology publishes here Dr Anthony Pelosi’s analysis of questionable science by one of the world’s best known psychologists, the late Professor Hans J Eysenck. The provenance of a huge body of data produced by Eysenck and Ronald Grossarth-Maticek is highly controversial. In Open Letters to King’s College London and the …

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The Strange Self-Motion Illusion

Anomalous experiences tend to jolt one out of one’s comfort zone, tell us interesting things about how the mind works.  A vivid déjà vu, strange coincidence, or unexpected illusion can all be automatic attention-grabbers.  Some of the oddest experiences are visual. When a large part of the visual field moves, the viewer can momentarily believe …

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Cochrane Catastrophe

Peter Gøtzsche’s Expulsion Triggers Mass Resignation The Board of a prestigious scientific organisation, The Cochrane Collaboration,  recently suffered a mass resignation.  This post documents the reasons why, using the words of the organisation itself. The board has been reduced from 13 to 6 members, following a vote to expel a founding member  for the first time in …

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Post-Traumatic Growth

Post-Traumatic Growth  Experiences of life disruption, threat, distress, or adversity can lead to positively evaluated “growth” (Tedeschi and Calhoun, 1995). It has been observed for centuries that benefit finding and posttraumatic growth (PTG) can follow the occurrence of traumatic events including accidents, warfare, death of a loved one, and cancer diagnosis and treatment (Stanton, 2010). …

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The PACE Trial: A Catalogue of Errors

What was the PACE Trial? Rarely in the history of clinical medicine have doctors and patients been placed so bitterly at loggerheads. The dispute had been a long time coming. Thirty years ago, a few psychiatrists and psychologists offered a hypothesis based on a Psychological Theory in which ME/CFS is constructed as a psychosocial illness. According …

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Psychology – Science or Delusion?

‘Mass Delusion’ Psychology is full of theories, not ‘General Theories’, but ‘Mini-Theories’ or ‘Models’.  Most Mini-Theories/Models are wrong.  Unfortunately these incorrect theories and models often persist in everyday practice. This happens because Psychologists are reluctant to give up their theories. These incorrect theories then act like ‘mass delusions’, which can have consequences for others, especially …

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