Category: Fraud

Hans Eysenck and Carl Sargent’s Dishonesty in Parapsychology

Context I write this blog as a long-term investigator into psychology and the paranormal. This post concerns a saga of intellectual dishonesty by the late Cambridge University psychologist, Carl Sargent, and his mentor, Professor Hans J Eysenck, of King’s College London. A diary of events weaves a dark story that many wish the world would …

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Master Faker H J Eysenck

“People fake only when they need to fake.” The replication crisis in science begins with faked data. I discuss here a well-known recent case, Hans J Eysenck. An enquiry at King’s College London and scientific journals  concluded that multiple publications by Hans J Eysenck’s are ‘unsafe’ and must be retracted. These recent events suggest that the entire …

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Uri Geller: Self-Proclaimed ‘Psychic’

A flash-back to 1975 when Uri Geller came to town.  Super-psychic or super-charlatan? Who to Believe? On the one hand, a scientific report published in Nature verifying Geller’s psychic abilities under supposedly cheat-proof conditions, and on the other, a highly speculative but critical attack published simultaneously in New Scientist. While Targ and Puthoff’s reply … …

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H J Eysenck’s ‘Unsafe’ Publications Total 148

This post updates the situation regarding publications by Hans J Eysenck that are deemed ‘unsafe’. The 148 publications include 87 publications identified by David F Marks and Roderick D Buchanan and 61 papers in two journals flagged by SAGE Publications on 10 February 2020 (details below). To date, only fourteen of HJ Eysenck’s 148 suspect …

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KCL Enquiry Stopped Prematurely

HANS EYSENCK EXPOSURE In 2019 we exposed the largest fraud ever perpetrated in the history of psychology (Marks, 2019; Pelosi, 2019). This audacious fraud was carried out by the UK’s most published and best known psychologist, the late Professor Hans J Eysenck (1916-1997), by all accounts, a maverick and controversial figure. We called for an enquiry …

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Personality and Fatal Diseases: Revisiting a Scientific Scandal

New paper by Dr Anthony Pelosi Abstract During the 1980s and 1990s, Hans J Eysenck conducted a programme of research into the causes, prevention and treatment of fatal diseases in collaboration with one of his protégés, Ronald Grossarth-Maticek. This led to what must be the most astonishing series of findings ever published in the peer-reviewed …

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Scientific Fraud at London University

The University of London (UL) is a complex, federal institution including University College London (UCL) the LSE, King’s College London and the London Business School. The University is the world’s oldest provider of academic awards through distance and flexible learning, dating back to 1858. The UL website proudly announces that it: “has been shortlisted for …

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Special issue on the PACE Trial

Critique by Keith Geraghty and Special Issue Editorial in the Journal of Health Psychology (July 31, 2017) I reproduce here my Editorial from the Special Issue of the Journal of Health Psychology on the PACE Trial. The issue contained an incisive critique of the trial by Dr. Keith J Geraghty (pictured). Keith Geraghty’s landmark paper, …

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Personality, Heart Disease and Cancer: A Chequered History

Type A and B Personality We discuss here the chequered history of the claims by Psychologists and others about the links between personality and illness, particularly heart disease and cancer. The research has been marred by dirty money and allegations of fraud. Speculation about ‘Type A’ and ‘Type B’ personalities and coronary heart disease (CHD) …

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The PACE Trial: A Catalogue of Errors

What was the PACE Trial? Rarely in the history of clinical medicine have doctors and patients been placed so bitterly at loggerheads. The dispute had been a long time coming. Thirty years ago, a few psychiatrists and psychologists offered a hypothesis based on a Psychological Theory in which ME/CFS is constructed as a psychosocial illness. According …

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