Category: Science of Psychology

Homeostasis, Exercise, and COVID-19 Isolation

The Value of Exercise A recent post explored human needs during COVID-19 isolation. The success of social isolation policies will depend on minimizing long-term depreciation of mental health. In this post, I explain the benefits of developing a system of daily exercise to bolster well-being. Exercise is an under-utilised resource that is freely available to …

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Human Needs in COVID-19 Isolation

A Perfect Storm These are extraordinary times. Throughout history there have been plenty of pandemics but the human response to COVID-19 is unprecedented. The world will never be the same again. It is estimated that close to four billion people are living in social isolation during this mother of all pandemics (Sandford, 2020). Unless there is a revolt, policies of social isolation in one form or another are expected …

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The ‘COMA-B’ System for Behaviour Change: Reset of the COM-B

The COM-B System In 2011, three psychologists, Susan Michie, Maartje M van Stralen and Robert West (MSW, 2011), proposed “a ‘behaviour system’ involving three essential conditions: capability, opportunity, and motivation…This forms the hub of a ‘behaviour change wheel’ (BCW).” MSW mention two sources for the idea of the COM-B: “a US consensus meeting of behavioural …

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A General Theory of Behaviour VI: Wayne Rooney, Imaging and Action

Introspections by the footballer Wayne Rooney address key issues in our theory. This post is concerned with the very same issue: how are thinking, feeling and action directly connected? What do Wayne Rooney and AGTB have in common? “I always like to picture the game the night before: I’ll ask the kitman what kit we’re …

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A General Theory of Behaviour V: Learning, Striving and Inhibiting

In this fifth article concerning AGTB. I describe basic principles of learning, striving and inhibiting behaviour. Among other things, it includes the Law of Effect which was derived from studies with cats. “responses that produce a satisfying effect in a particular situation become more likely to occur again in that situation.” Edward Thorndike, 1898 LEARNING …

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A General Theory of Behaviour IV: Entrainment, Rhythm and Synchronicity

The fourth part in a series about A General Theory of Behaviour. I examine homeostasis, synchronicity and circadian systems in the regulation of arousal, behaviour and sociality.                                                    This is a …

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A General Theory of Behaviour III: Homeostasis, Balance and Stability

This post describes homeostasis as a fundamental principle in behaviour and motivation. The fixity of the milieu supposes a perfection of the organism such that the external variations are at each instant compensated for and equilibrated…. All of the vital mechanisms, however varied they may be, have always one goal, to maintain the uniformity of the …

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A General Theory of Behaviour II: Restructured Hierarchy of Needs

This second post on A General Theory of Behaviour (AGTB) incorporates an amended form of Abraham Maslow’s (1943) motivational needs hierarchy described by Douglas T. Kenrick and colleagues  to which AGTB has added the process of Type II homeostasis.   Modifying Maslow Abraham Harold Maslow (April 1, 1908 – June 8, 1970) was best known for the foundation …

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A General Theory of Behaviour I

The first in a 12-part series about A General Theory of Behaviour (AGTB). AGTB is a new theory of behaviour founded on the principle of ‘Psychological Homeostasis’. AGTB includes 20 principles and 80 associated propositions (AP).   I trace here the history of the theory of Psychological Homeostasis as a universal principle of behaviour. This …

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I Am Conscious, Therefore, I Am

Abstract Organisms are adapted to each other and the environment because there is an inbuilt striving toward security, stability, and equilibrium. A General Theory of Behavior connects imagery, affect, and action with the central executive system we call consciousness, a direct emergent property of cerebral activity. The General Theory is founded on the assumption that …

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