Science is Beautiful

Science is beautiful when it makes simple explanations of phenomena or connections between different observations. Examples include the double helix in biology and the fundamental equations of physics. Steven Hawking I have something beautiful to offer, not in Biology or in Physics, but in Psychology: “A General Theory of Behaviour”. It’s got harmony, synchrony andContinue reading “Science is Beautiful”

ME/CFS and the PACE trial

Here I review the disastrous trial known as the ‘PACE trial’. This updates a post from several years ago. Readers may also be interested in seeing the Special Issue on the PACE trial in the Journal of Health Psychology (2017). Review of the evidence indicates that none of the Wessely School’s hypotheses about the causesContinue reading “ME/CFS and the PACE trial”

A New Depth-Rescaling Illusion

Most visual illusions are produced using carefully contrived drawings or gadgets to fool the visual system into thinking impossible things.  As described in an earlier post, while waiting at a train station, I encountered an apparently real-life Ponzo illusion. Here I explain why I think the new illusion is more strange and more interesting thanContinue reading “A New Depth-Rescaling Illusion”

Mood Homeostasis in COVID-19 Lockdown

July 29, 2020 An earlier post suggested that COVID-19 lockdowns create a ‘perfect storm’ of vulnerabilities that huge numbers of people, and services, are ill-prepared to manage.  I reviewed the science of human needs as they are expected to play out over prolonged periods of domestic confinement. More details were published in our article in the Journal of Health Psychology. Psychological homeostasis is a natural ability to maintain stability,Continue reading “Mood Homeostasis in COVID-19 Lockdown”

“The whole mess started very early in his career”

Hans Eysenck’s False Claims Began in the 1950s and 60s Evidence from Joachim Funke of the Psychologisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg shows that Hans Eysenck’s scholarly output was untrustworthy from the very beginning of his career. In the 1950s and 60s Eysenck positioned himself as the ‘enfant terrible’ of psychoanalysis. Eysenck claimed the evidence in supportContinue reading ““The whole mess started very early in his career””

Institutional Logics, the British Psychological Society and Hans Eysenck

The Journal of Health Psychology has published a new paper on “Research misconduct complaints and institutional logics: The case of Hans Eysenck and the British Psychological Society” [October 28, 2020]. The paper provides an analysis of the reasons Hans J Eysenck’s misconduct has not been fully investigated by the BPS. The authors, Russell Craig, AnthonyContinue reading “Institutional Logics, the British Psychological Society and Hans Eysenck”

Hans Eysenck and Carl Sargent’s Dishonesty in Parapsychology

Context I write this blog as a long-term investigator into psychology and the paranormal. This post concerns a saga of intellectual dishonesty by the late Cambridge University psychologist, Carl Sargent, and his mentor, Professor Hans J Eysenck, of King’s College London. A diary of events weaves a dark story that many wish the world wouldContinue reading “Hans Eysenck and Carl Sargent’s Dishonesty in Parapsychology”

Why ESP can never be found inside the laboratory. A new approach to the investigation of the paranormal

From the Preface [An ESP experiment] “immediately appeals to his [or her] unconscious readiness to witness a miracle, and to the hope, latent in all [people], that such a thing may yet be possible. Primitive superstition lies just below the surface of even the most tough-minded individuals, and it is precisely those who most fight…” Continue reading “Why ESP can never be found inside the laboratory. A new approach to the investigation of the paranormal”

The General Theory of Behaviour II: Psychological Homeostasis – How Does It Work?

In the second in a series about the General Theory of Behaviour (GTB) I trace the history of the construct of ‘Psychological Homeostasis’ as a universal principle of behaviour. The GTB is a new theory of behaviour founded on the principle of ‘Psychological Homeostasis’.  The GTB includes 20 principles and 80 associated propositions (AP). ThisContinue reading “The General Theory of Behaviour II: Psychological Homeostasis – How Does It Work?”

The General Theory of Behaviour III: A Restructured Hierarchy of Needs

This third post on the General Theory of Behaviour (GTB) incorporates an amended form of Abraham Maslow’s (1943) motivational needs hierarchy described by Douglas T. Kenrick and colleagues  to which AGTB has added the process of Type II homeostasis. Modifying Maslow Abraham Harold Maslow (April 1, 1908 – June 8, 1970) was best known for the foundation ofContinue reading “The General Theory of Behaviour III: A Restructured Hierarchy of Needs”